Tag Archives: cancer

Kimberly’s Story

On October 5th, 2016 we had the honor of working with 9 beautiful Breast Cancer survivors. They each wrote about their journey in their own words. 

One of the most feared things a woman can hear is “You have breast cancer.”

My journey began like many others.  I was going about my life, paving my way in the world, and never for a moment, thinking about breast cancer.

The summer of 2003 was like any other, and it came.  I felt a small something on the outer part of my left breast.  I had an old mammogram order that had expired and thought to use it anyhow.  I called for a mammogram appointment and they scheduled me for a month away.  My husband thought that was a bit far out so I called back the next day and it just so happened they had a cancellation that day. I went in with my expired mammogram order and they did not realize it was expired until after my mammogram.  The Radiologist came in with the first of my bad news.  “You have many suspicious micro calcification’s,” and wanted me to get an ultrasound right away.  The next day I got my ultrasound… Same results… not good… I need a biopsy.

After a recommendation from Margaret McCoy I went to Dr. West at the Breast Care Center in Orange.  His opinion was the same… I need a biopsy and if it is cancer, a mastectomy was my only option.  June 9, 2003 was my biopsy.  The surgery went fine and I was on my way back home.

A couple days later as I sat in my living room by myself Dr. West called with the news no one ever wants to hear… you have cancer.  This is where my journey began…I spent sleepless nights searching the web for information about breast cancer.

I’m not really sure when that moment passed.  After the initial shock and hysteria wore off, I created a believable illusion that I was okay.  That I could handle whatever cancer handed me because I was a fighter, and I was tough.  I let autopilot take over as I phoned friends to break the news.  I hate those words. YOU. HAVE. CANCER.

I met with Dr. West to learn my options.   It was all too much to take.  Without a second thought I made the decision to have a bilateral mastectomy.   I needed to do everything I could do reduce my risk of developing a new breast cancer in the future. I just wanted to get rid of this “cancer” thing in my body.

I found a web site called Avon Breast Cancer Crusade.  The moment I logged on to the site, I felt like I had arrived.  I was surrounded by a cyber sorority.  Women from all walks of life with one common bond.  They were all mad as hell, and not taking cancer lightly.  After a few days on the discussion boards I had a core circle of friends.  These girls were my salvation.  I learned more from them then I did from any of my doctors.

After meeting with Dr. West, I met my oncologist, Dr. Margileth.  As the doctor looked over my chart the next agenda was to talk about additional treatments… Chemo. I told him I would decide if I liked him if he let me keep my hair.  He then gave me a couple of options.  Given my stage one option was to take a lighter dose of chemo over a longer period of time and I could keep my hair.  That was it… I wanted it.

I left the office with a plan. Cancer thought it had one up on me, but with my plan set in motion, I leveled the playing field.  Cancer was missing one important piece of information–  that I only play to win.

First on the agenda… a bi-lateral mastectomy from Dr. West and Dr. Hagstrom, my plastic surgeon, would come right behind him and recreate the breast Dr. West removed.  Using my tummy fat and 12 hours of surgery I had my new mounds.

It was not an easy recovery but it was very doable.

Next on the agenda was Chemo…

I went into chemo like it was my first day at school; determined to divide and conquer.  My wrists were piled high with pink bracelets.  I wore pink from head to toe, I was ready for war.  My best friend Jeanne Shroyer sat by my side at every chemo party we went to, that’s what I called it… “My Chemo Party”.

On weeks to come, life was anything but normal.  I went to a class called, “Look Good, Feel Good.”  I remember sitting in this class and they offered me a wig and I said “no thank you I’m not going to lose my hair”.  At that moment a women across the table lifted her wig off and said “that’s what they told me”.  I know the look on my face told it all but I kindly said “I’ll wait”.

I quickly learned how to be my own best advocate.  I researched, and read books.  I joined every online cancer community that was available.  Within these cyber walls, I found a sisterhood that welcomed me with open arms.  If I had a question, my sisters had the answer.  When I experienced side effects from treatment, my sisters knew how to ease my pain.  Although I had a huge support team of family and friends in my corner,  I knew they could never fully understand.  I knew that they wanted me to be okay, so I swallowed my hurt and put on a brave front.  With my cyber sisters, there was no need to hide.  When someone was sick, we prayed.  When someone was sad, we listened.  When someone had surgery we sent gentle hugs.  When someone was dying, we put our own fears of death aside, and mourned a life that was not done living.

It was the beginning of the next chapter of reclaiming my life.

I had a lot of good days, and I felt like the worst was behind me.  But, the downside of having so many friends in the cancer community is the reality that some of them will have a recurrence, and some of them will die.  I realized early on, that just because I got better, the fight against cancer wasn’t over.  I felt this rite of passage from the sisterhood, this sense of duty to help women through the emotional roller coaster of cancer.  I began to mentor women going through breast cancer on my own.  In 2008 Janelle Basham and myself were asked to take over the Bosom Buddies, a breast cancer support organization founded in the early 90’s by Carolyn Knight, Margaret McCoy, Linda Johnson and Cathy Zaitz  all of Canyon Lake, CA.  It was a club dedicated to support woman in their struggle with breast Cancer.  Our mission as a Bosom Buddy is to Educate, Inspire and Support newly diagnosed Breast Cancer Survivors during their Breast Cancer Journey.

This experience is more than I ever could have imagined.  I am a part of something that is so much bigger than me, and for that I am so grateful.  I have the chance to give back what I’ve received.
It brings me great joy to celebrate being a survivor, although it has come at a price.  I have lived through triumph and hope, just as I have lived through sadness and loss.  I celebrate to honor the lives that cancer has cut short.  I celebrate for my sisters who are sick, with hopes for brighter days ahead.  I celebrate those that came before me, and those that undoubtedly will come after me.  And when the day arrives, when we finally have a cure for this life changing illness, that will be the greatest celebration of them all.

 

Check out Kathy’s Story HERE

Check out Debbie’s Story HERE

Check out Janelle’s Story HERE

Check out Maja’s Story HERE

Check out Crystal’s Story HERE

Check out Mary’s Story HERE

Check out Laura’s Story HERE

Check out Sylvia’s Story HERE

Kathy’s Story

On October 5th, 2016 we had the honor of working with 9 beautiful Breast Cancer survivors. They each wrote about their journey in their own words. 

As my family planned a huge party to celebrate my 50th birthday, we also were preparing for my bilateral mastectomy just three days later. A mammogram earlier that summer had given me a clean bill of health, but an MRI weeks later led to the diagnosis of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma in October of 2013.  I had faithfully visited Temecula Valley Imaging every few years, as I watched my mother and my aunt (her sister) deal with pre-menopausal breast cancer in their forties, and I was well aware that “early detection saves lives”.  I had confided in my younger sister, Meri, that I expected to get breast cancer someday, but nothing truly prepared me for the news I had been dreading my whole life.

I was aware that I had dense breast tissue, like many other women, but I didn’t realize this increased my chances of developing cancer, or that it made it more difficult for mammograms to detect cancer tumors.   Thankfully, Dr. Amy Bremner of Breastlink in Murrieta recommended I have the MRI due to my family history, and the fact that I had dense breasts. My cancer diagnosis came after a biopsy of the suspicious area, which turned out to be the exact location of my mother’s tumor.  Subsequent genetic testing came back negative for both of the breast cancer genes, but I feel strongly that there is a yet undiscovered gene lurking in my DNA that scientists have yet to identify.

Make sure every woman you love knows about self-breast exams, and gets their mammogram annually once they reach the age of 40.  If you have a family history of breast cancer, these screenings may need to be sooner. Additionally, in September of 2012 a Breast Density Notification Law (SB 1538) was enacted which requires physicians to inform women who have dense breast tissue of possible additional screening options.  This new legislation saved my life!

I cannot tell you how many women I have met who shared that they have not yet had a mammogram because they were afraid of what they might discover. Early detection IS the key, and gives you the best chance to become a survivor if cancer is detected.  You owe it to your family who loves you; please schedule your baseline mammogram today!

I am so very thankful to my amazing family who supported me throughout all of my surgeries. I’m also thankful to Janelle and Kimbo of the Bosom Buddies support group who were available to answer my questions, and continue to support me and other women fighting cancer.  And last, but not least, I’m thankful for the many women who have paved the road before me so that my own journey was not so bumpy.  I will continue to fight like a girl, be brave through whatever challenges lie ahead, and share my story with anyone who will listen!

Check out Kimberly’s Story HERE

Check out Debbie’s Story HERE

Check out Janelle’s Story HERE

Check out Maja’s Story HERE

Check out Crystal’s Story HERE

Check out Mary’s Story HERE

Check out Laura’s Story HERE

Check out Sylvia’s Story HERE

Maja’s Story

On October 5th, 2016 we had the honor of working with 9 beautiful Breast Cancer survivors. They each wrote about their journey in their own words. 

A client of mine who became a good friend had been waging a long fight with cancer.  She insisted that I promise to never skip a mammogram, something I had not considered important in the past.  Sadly, after 18 years she lost the battle.

Not long after, I received a reminder from Kaiser to schedule a mammogram.  I remembered my promise and followed through.  A couple of days after my screening, my husband and I went to  Catalina to do some scuba diving and hiking.  I remember how strong and healthy I felt that day.  Afterward, upon arrival at home, I listened to a message advising a second appointment and ultrasound.  Chills ran through me and I recalled a dream I had on Christmas Day the year before.  I dreamt I was  a cancer survivor and a spokesperson for some organization.  I could not believe this was happening!

Within a couple of days I had a series of mammograms and knew I was in big trouble.  The physician suggested an immediate biopsy.  After the biopsy, surgery was scheduled. In absolute shock and shaking, I put an ice pack on my chest and went straight to work.  After work, I told my husband I had cancer.  This was the hardest time of the whole ordeal, afraid of the unknown and upset that my body had let me down after years of taking good care of myself.  My doctor convinced me that being in good condition would hasten recovery.  He was right.

My friends and coworkers helped me maintain a positive attitude and I focused on the needs of my clients.  But, after work I would go to my car and emotionally collapse for a few minutes.  Then I employed the same techniques I used to get through bad situations under water:  “Maja, stay calm.  Think straight.  You can do it!”  Then I would crank up the radio volume and scream my lungs out singing along with rock and roll singers.

It was less than a month from my first mammogram to surgery.  My doctor was very good and I trusted his experience.  On the day of surgery, my husband was stressed out so I drove myself.  It actually worked out well because I was concentrating on driving instead of worrying.  The surgery went well.  It was on a Monday and by Wednesday I was walking.  By Sunday I was walking my regular five miles, and by Tuesday I was back at work.  Every day for five weeks I went for radiation then to work.  After work, I went for walks with my husband and made dinner.  I was not going to let cancer take over my life.

I was not yet done with radiation when friends encouraged me to join the Race for the Cure.  It was such an amazing and emotional experience full of love and support.  We ran 5K and I dropped cancer right there in front of Nordstrom!

For about six months, I felt like a road bump detector, feeling every movement, every imperfection in the road.  What really helped me was returning to normalcy as soon as I was able to– working, exercising, having a monthly massage, and being surrounded by healthy supportive people.  Life is beautiful if you open yourself up to it.

Writing this story brought back some uncomfortable memories and feelings and I almost gave up, but as usual I invoked my self-pep talk:  “ You can do it Maja!”

 

Check out Kimberly’s Story HERE

Check out Kathy’s Story HERE

Check out Debbie’s Story HERE

Check out Janelle’s Story HERE

Check out Crystal’s Story HERE

Check out Mary’s Story HERE

Check out Laura’s Story HERE

Check out Sylvia’s Story HERE

Crystal’s Story

On October 5th, 2016 we had the honor of working with 9 beautiful Breast Cancer survivors. They each wrote about their journey in their own words. 

One day when I was getting out of the shower, my husband pointed out a lump in my breast. I assumed it was a clogged milk duct, because I had just stopped breast feeding, but promised him I would ask my doctor about it at my upcoming appointment. My gynecologist suggested I get a mammogram as a precaution, but because I was only 29, healthy, and had no family history of cancer there wasn’t anything to worry about. It was probably just a cyst. I wasn’t worried.

I went for the mammogram, waited in the room with all of the old ladies, and even the technician laughed when she saw my age. But then, while she was doing the mammogram her demeanor changed completely when blood came out of my nipple. She said I needed to go get an ultrasound and because I had a PPO, I was heading there now. The ultrasound technician seemed nervous and after doing her exam asked for a doctor to come in. The doctor said he needed to do a biopsy, today. He did three: one in my armpit, and two in my breast. I asked why I was getting a biopsy in my armpit, and the assistant said “because it can spread.” I didn’t ask what she meant because at that point, I already knew. The doctor said a breast surgeon would call me with results. The next day I went to work in a fog and waited impatiently for the call. When the surgeon finally called, she asked for me to come in for results. I asked her to please just say the word over the phone, and she did: Cancer.

The surgeon referred me to Dr. Link, founding oncologist of Breastlink, in Orange County because of my age and type of cancer. He said it was Her-2 positive, approximately 7 cm total, and had spread to my lymph nodes, making me a stage 2 or 3. The first step to my recovery was chemotherapy because he wanted to get my rapid-growing tumors under control. He could provide no answers when I asked the one question I still have no answer to today: why? Why did this happen to a healthy, 29-year old mom and teacher, with no history of cancer in her family, who exercises and eats blueberries in her oatmeal everyday? He could only say: You’re one of the random, unlucky ones.

After six rounds of two types of chemotherapy and herceptin infusions, my tumors hadn’t gone away or even gone down as much as they’d hoped. His next step was a mastectomy and lymph node removal. I opted for a bi-lateral mastectomy for aesthetic and preventative purposes. While the surgeon was in there he took 17 lymph nodes as well. I had my patchy head shaved on my eldest daughter’s fifth birthday; I had my bilateral mastectomy on my youngest daughter’s second birthday. A lot can happen in just a few, short months.

After my surgery, I was told they didn’t get the margins they were hoping for and they suggested further treatment. Once my expanders for reconstruction were completely filled, I started radiation. I remember going to get radiation every day after work (33 rounds total), and although I was still getting herceptin infusions, my hair was growing back. Finally, exactly one year after diagnosis I received my final herceptin infusion and was done with cancer treatment, besides a daily tamoxifen pill. A few months later, I got my expanders removed and implants put in, but never elected to have nipples tattooed. I qualified for extensive genetic testing, but the results have still been inconclusive.
And I thought that the worst part of 2011 was going to be turning 30. Being blindsided by a breast cancer diagnosis at such a young age was a traumatizing experience to say the least, but it gave me the unique, albeit unwarranted, opportunity to inspire others with my optimism, courage, and hope in a way I never could have predicted. I wrote a blog so I could document my experience for my children. I thought it was going to serve as a memory for them when I passed away. I am so beyond thankful to say that we will get to read it together.

Check out Crystal’s blog here – Wearpink.weebly.com

 

Check out Kimberly’s Story HERE

Check out Kathy’s Story HERE

Check out Debbie’s Story HERE

Check out Janelle’s Story HERE

Check out Maja’s Story HERE

Check out Mary’s Story HERE

Check out Laura’s Story HERE

Check out Sylvia’s Story HERE

 

Sylvia’s Story

On October 5th, 2016 we had the honor of working with 9 beautiful Breast Cancer survivors. They each wrote about their journey in their own words. 

It was the summer of 2012.  We were getting ready to take my youngest daughter to school in New Hampshire, when I discovered an indentation on my left breast.  I tried not to make a big deal about it but it never left my mind.  I was preoccupied with the trip at the time.

When we got back, I made an appointment for my mammogram.  After the appointment they told me I had to get a biopsy because they had found a small lump on my breast.  My mother, my husband, and I went for the results and got the worst news of my life.  All I heard were your results tested positive for “BREAST CANCER” and the rest was a big blur.  I thought that was the end for me.

I was given a few options for my surgery, which included a lumpectomy or a mastectomy.  I decided to go with the mastectomy.    About three months after my surgery, I started chemotherapy, which was not the greatest thing I’ve ever done.   I lost all of my hair a few weeks later, but I didn’t mind since I was able to wear some cute hats, wigs and head covers that my family bought for me.

My reconstruction started at the end of 2013.  The procedure I chose was a Bilateral Free Flap reconstruction, which is the process of removing fat tissue and muscle from my abdomen and fashioning it in to my new breasts.  When I woke up from the 13 hour procedure, I looked like a “stuffed burrito” from all the swelling.   That was one of the worst things I’ve ever had to go through.  My recovery was slow but with the support of my loving family, my faith in God and a positive attitude, I was able to conquer that feat.

This life changing experience has made me a stronger, more faithful, and hopeful person.  It is a blessing to be alive today and to be called a “SURVIVOR”.

 

Check out Kimberly’s Story HERE

Check out Kathy’s Story HERE

Check out Debbie’s Story HERE

Check out Janelle’s Story HERE

Check out Maja’s Story HERE

Check out Crystal’s Story HERE

Check out Mary’s Story HERE

Check out Laura’s Story HERE

 

Laura’s Story

On October 5th, 2016 we had the honor of working with 9 beautiful Breast Cancer survivors. They each wrote about their journey in their own words. 

In August of 2015 I turned 40, I went to my Doctor’s for my annual physical and he referred me out to have a mammogram (because I was 40 now), so in December of 2015 I had my very first mammogram (oh and by the way, it’s not that bad, not bad at all, I mention this because prior to going in for my first mammogram, I had heard stories about how painful it is and they smash your boobies until they are flat as a pancakes, that can scare a woman a little bit or a lot).

Shortly after that, I received notification that they wanted to do an ultrasound (I freaked out). I was told that it is very common to follow up with an ultrasound after you’ve had your first mammogram. So I had a private one done (because I couldn’t stand the nerves)and I was told that there was nothing to worry about, normal and small micro calcification tissue, nothing alarming and they would not biopsy, no lumps, no tumors. I then had another ultrasound done (this one referred by mammogram and I did not mention to them that I had already had a private ultrasound done). This ultrasound led to a biopsy, again I was told not to worry, normal procedure, again I was told that I had normal, small micro calcification tissue, very common in majority of women, no lumps and no tumors, just being precautious I suppose, honestly I don’t know why or who decided to biopsy my right breast but this is what saved my life and changed everything.

I went in for my biopsy on March 2016, St. Patty’s day, I’ll never forget. The woman who performed my mammogram, and the woman who performed my ultrasound were both there to assist the Doctor with my biopsy. The 2 women, had told me that they had never assisted in a biopsy together with the same patient, and one of the woman was Irish and being that it was St. Patrick’s day, this was my lucky day!! They were so sweet and told me not to worry about anything, this time next week I would be celebrating, cancer free most likely, because odds are with me, 85% of woman come back negative for breast cancer.

I don’t know why I thought, what about the other 15%? I also remember thinking, I can’t be the exception, I am a woman too and who falls into that 15%? I had 3 biopsies done on my right breast. I gave it a few days and then started hounding my Primary Doctor for results.

Turns out, I was part of that 15%, within a 3 month period I had had my first mammogram ever, a couple of ultrasounds, 3 biopsies on my right breast and confirmation that I had stage 0 breast cancer in my right breast (DCIS, Ductal Carcinoma In Situ), the cancer was not spreading, it was trapped in the milk ducts. Oh and I didn’t get a straight answer either, no one wants to be the one to confirm that you have cancer. You could say that I kind of harassed people into confirming, I was like, “I need a yes or no answer because I just didn’t understand any of the terms.” Not only did I call my Primary Doctor’s office and his cell, I called the location that did my biopsy and I called City of Hope, I read the diagnosis and asked Yes or No? I asked what does this term mean and I read the term to them DCIS, I read everything to them that was on that form, after a little hesitation from everyone, it was a yes. I met with my Primary who went over my options, including Double Mastectomy.

I will never forget that conversation. I had no idea what to expect. I thank my Doctor so much for going over ALL my options. I say this because when I first met with the Surgeon/Doctor that was going to “remove” the cancer, this (double mastectomy) was not one of the options given. Had I not known everything I needed to know before meeting with that surgeon I probably would have been so happy to hear that I wasn’t going to die and we are saving my breast by treating the area (possibly lumpectomy), remember I have no lumps and no tumors. I mentioned “double mastectomy”, a bit extreme in my case. It was however, the only option for me. Too many stories of woman who are in the same situation as mine and only treat the area, only to find out years later that the cancer is back, or in the other breast and always much more aggressive than the first time around.

I did not want to take that chance.

Also, I never, ever self examined, I was always very honest with my Doctors about this, I know it’s bad but I am a hypochondriac and I would have been in the doctor’s office every week, if not every day thinking there was something wrong with me and self examination would not have discovered the cancer because I had no lumps or tumors. Everything was happening so quickly. Oh and by the way I tested negative for the BRCA gene. My surgery for my double mastectomy and immediate reconstruction occurred on June 15, 2016, this was the best decision I could have made, and my Surgeons were great. I got to keep most of my skin and all of my muscle, none of my lymph nodes had been affected by cancer, we did not spare my nipples or aeriolas. We (my Doctor’s and I)  don’t believe that I will  need any chemo or radiation, still waiting to see the Oncologist.

I am currently under reconstruction, I have expanders in that are filled once a week to stretch my skin and get me ready for permanent implants and eventually they’ll make me some new nipples and aeriolas, it’s amazing what they can do. Everything is coming along just fine, I did have a little “bump in the road”, a little “hick up”. A couple of months ago I noticed a little hole, the size of a pen mark on my scar on my right breast, so my Dr. did not fill, we watched it, hoping it would scab up and heal but it didn’t. Instead the hole kept getting bigger, my Dr. removed some fill to relax my skin and hopefully allow it to heal on its own, my Dr. did not fill me for about a month, he saw me once a week and assured me there was no infection, because of course, being the hypochondriac that I am, I was terrified of an infection. I wasn’t healing and the hole was just getting bigger, my Dr. scheduled another surgery on September 14, 2016, only 3 months after my double mastectomy.

He opened me back up, removed more fill and made sure everything looked good (no infection) and closed me back up. Today (Oct.3, 2016) we began filing my right breast again. I am happy to say that I am healing perfectly well. I can’t help but to think how lucky I am, the 2 ladies that assisted with my biopsy were absolutely right, that day was my lucky day, it was the day that my breast which had absolutely no lumps or tumors were still tested for breast cancer and I was extremely lucky that they discovered it at stage 0 and I was able to make a life saving decision.

I am a survivor of Breast Cancer and this is my story.

Check out Kimberly’s Story HERE

Check out Kathy’s Story HERE

Check out Debbie’s Story HERE

Check out Janelle’s Story HERE

Check out Maja’s Story HERE

Check out Crystal’s Story HERE

Check out Mary’s Story HERE

Check out Sylvia’s Story HERE

Glen Ivy Honors Breast Cancer Awareness Month!

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and Glen Ivy will be decorated with Pink Ribbons! Throughout the month of October, as an additional step to your wellness and health, you can find breast cancer self-examination cards in showers.

Join us in honoring those who have had or have breast cancer on Breast Cancer Awareness Day, October 16th! On this day, Glen Ivy will give free admission to survivors or those currently battling breast cancer when they book an oncology treatment. Certain massages and treatments will be geared towards breast cancer survivors and patients, such as the oncology massage which you can find more information below:

Oncology Massage Benefits

Our Oncology Massage provides an in-depth consultation with an Oncology Certified Therapist, as well as a massage or skincare treatment customized to the individual needs of the oncology patient to accommodate any position, pressure or treatment site considerations. Our therapists have been extensively trained on clinically established guidelines to provide safe and effective techniques to accommodate the changing needs of any past or present oncology patient.  50 minutes $100.

What is an Oncology Massage?
A massage that is modified to the signs, symptoms and complications of cancer.

Can massage spread cancer?
Metastasis is a complex, biochemical process that is orchestrated by genetic mutations. Generally, the changes are the result of mutations in the cells’ DNA.  It is not a mechanical process increased by exercise or massage.  Cancer cells spread by DNA repeat code error.

Who needs Oncology Massage?
Anyone in, or with a history of, cancer treatment.

Oncology Massage absolute contraindications.

  • No deep tissue massage.
  • No massage over site of tumor
  • Essential Oils will not be used during the massage

Can a guest receive an Oncology Massage if they have damaged lymph nodes or if their lymph nodes have been removed?
A guest can receive an Oncology Massage in those cases. The guest should discuss it with their service provider to ensure their comfort and safety during their service.

Can a guest receive an Oncology Massage if they have lymphedema?
A guest can receive an Oncology Massage in this case. The guest should discuss it with their service provider to ensure their comfort and safety during their service.

 

Wellness Classes

Another component to Breast Cancer Awareness Month that focuses on wellness of the body is Qigong, which will be on Thursdays and Saturdays of this month at 1PM. Qigong is similar to Tai Chi and helps balance the body, emotions and mind by oxygenating the blood, promoting relaxation & increasing energy. Kiyomi Kajiyama will be teaching “Qigong and Sound Healing for Women’s Health” this month. This class will be led with moves that support hormone, reproductive organs and breast health.

 

Dessert and Drink Deal

Watch out for our special deal of the month! We will be selling a glass of wine with 2 chocolate-covered strawberries for only $10! A donation of $2 will be made for every order of this special.

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